Monday, May 10, 2010

Mortal Sin Flow Chart

I got really tired of my students asking if such and such is a mortal sin.  No matter how many times we went over what makes something a mortal sin, they didn't seem to get it.  Solution?  The Mortal Sin Flow Chart.  Using the easy question answer format of a flow chart along with the start and end procedures, students can use the Mortal Sin Flow Chart to determine if something is or is not a mortal sin.
 
 

9 comments:

Baron Korf said...

I'd say that the habitual question is borderline. But the rest is good.

Paul Cat said...

Technically, you are correct. The habitual one falls into he last point, and does not need to be stated. But so as to not have to go into why a habit is not concenting, it is easier to just make another question.

Steven said...

Why does the flowchart assume that for all "what you are considering"s the outcome is either mortally or venially sinful? Shouldn't the first fork be something like "Is what you are considering morally praiseworthy or at least permissible?"

Paul Cat said...

Because it is the "Mortal Sin Flow Chart" and not the "Moral Decision Making Flow Chart"

Though a "Moral Decision Making Flow Chart" might be fun to try making.

Also, when dealing with teenagers they never ask about what is morally permissible. They want to know whether sin 'xyz' is a mortal or venial sin. Most people already know what they are considering is either right or wrong. They just spend lots of time convincing that doing the wrong thing is permissible.

catechesisinthethirdmillennium said...

Good content. Thanks for sharing!

Bobakar said...

Something habitual can be mortally sinful. See CCC 1750. Habit seems to fall under circumstance. Futhermore, St. Thomas Aquinas says that habit makes a sin more grievous (malicious); cf. ST. I-II, q. 78, aa.2-4.

Paul Cat said...

Bobakar,

Thomas is using a different definition for habit than I am.

Thomas' understanding of habit is that one consents by means of reason to do or not to do the habit. Using Thomas' definition then habit does indeed fall into the mortal sin category.

What I mean by "habitual." I'm using the word in a strict sense: as in a habit is something that a person no longer thinks about doing or not doing, they just do it. In other words, a habit does not allow for full consent of the will. It by passes our reason. Habits can include things like addictions.

The CCC also states that "One commits venial sin when, in a less serious matter, he does not observe the standard prescribed by the moral law, or when he disobeys the moral law in a grave matter, but without full knowledge or without complete consent." Therefore since habits do not allow for a person to give full knowledge or complete consent the grave and serious matter is made less serious by it being a habitual sin. Some habitual sins that people can fall into: anger/wrath, sloth, greed, gossip, pre-marital sex, drunkenness, drugs, pornography, and the list might continue.

How the modern word uses habit, like how I am using it, would fall more into what Aquinas refers to as passion. That force or defect that resides outside the will.

Paul Cat said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Bridgetta said...

The Catechism of the Catholic Church says in paragraph 1446 that, "Christ instituted the sacrament of Penance for all sinful members of his Church: above all for those who, since Baptism, have fallen into grave sin, and have thus lost their baptismal grace and wounded ecclesial communion. It is to them that the sacrament of Penance offers a new possibility to convert and to recover the grace of justification. The Fathers of the Church present this sacrament as "the second plank [of salvation] after the shipwreck which is the loss of grace.""

According to Pope John Paul II the Catechism of the Catholic Church "is given as a sure and authentic reference text for teaching Catholic doctrine."

By the way a confession bible verse John 20:23 if anyone wants biblical proof. And Galatians 5:19-21 for mortal sin.

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